RFYL Weekly: 6 rules for figuring out your weekly mileage

This Saturday, December 12th, Run for Your Life participants will meet Ms. Kemp at the Manor facility at 8:30 am, then head over to the Jefferson Park track on 114th Street and 1st Avenue. The weather forecast calls for temperatures in the low to mid-50s. Team members: be sure to dress weather appropriate.

How Many Miles a Week to Run If You’re Training for a Race

By Ashley Mateo

Here’s the thing about race training: You want to run enough miles to physically prepare your body, but you also want to run as few miles as possible so you don’t overtax your body. But when training programs call for up to 200 miles of running before race day, it’s hard to know exactly where to draw that line.

How many miles should you run a day? A week? The answer really depends on your speed, your strength, and your experience—so there’s no one-size-fits-all mileage prescription. “Look at where you are right now,” says Melanie Kann, an RRCA-certified running coach for New York Road Runners. “If you’re running your first-ever 5K, you might start with a 5-mile-per-week program. If you’re running your first marathon, you might start with a 15-mile-per-week training plan.” Larger race distances require more of a base to start with (at least four months of consistent running, she recommends), but no matter what your end goal, you have to start with what you’re currently capable of doing versus what you want to be doing.

Click here to read the rest of the article on Runner’s World.

Coach Andre’s tip:

A team leader’s main objective is to pace their group while motivating and encouraging runners to complete the base pace goal set by the coaching staff.

Rather than changing the group’s training regime to match their own pace, team leaders should do their training runs on separate days. As a pace leader, you can use this group run as a recovery run. This will give your body a break from the hard training runs and allow your fatigued muscles time to recover.